The Inaugural Royal Rehab Alex Ommanney Prize in Social Work was awarded to Emily James

The inaugural Royal Rehab Alex Ommanney Prize in social work being  awarded to Emily James by Stephen Lowndes, CEO Royal Rehab.

This prize was awarded to Emily in 2018. I didn’t post the news initially but realised recently a delayed post took nothing away from her success.

Emily won the prize with an essay addressing how her experience would influence her practice as a Social Worker. Her writing is honest and insightful so I have inserted some snippets of her prize winning submission to raise awareness of a social workers role.

Social Work – Emily’s First Point

Following my accident I suddenly became part of a minority group, a group with barriers and began to start hearing the word ‘no’ more often. ‘No you can’t have that’, ‘no you can’t do that’, ‘no you can’t go there’. I have belonged to the world of disability for a minute compared to others, nevertheless I am already frustrated at the discrimination and oppression I have experienced and witnessed. In 2015, 18.3% (4.3 million) of Australians reported having a disability and within that population almost one in twelve reported experiencing discrimination based on their disability (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016).”

Social Work – Emily’s Aim

In my future role as a social worker I want to work towards removing the ‘cannot’ and reducing the discrimination and oppression experienced by individuals with a disability.”

Social Work – Human Rights Model

Human services have greater emphasise on removing barriers to improve opportunities and access for all disabled individuals. This approach is known as a social or human rights model and is important because it prioritises societal change and empowers people with disabilities (PWD) to view themselves as citizens that face discrimination and not individuals that are sick and invalid (Shakespeare, 2014). Nevertheless discrimination and oppression remain and disabled individuals still experience inequalities in health, education and employment.”

Social Work – Client Driven

My belief remains in the importance of social inclusion policies and anti-oppressive practice that are client driven.”

Social Work – Moving Forward

Emily’s thoughts progress: “I must keep in mind that despite the work of disability activists, many of whom are themselves disabled, the Human Rights Model has been criticised for failing to consider the individual’s experience. Therefore, it is imperative that in utilising this approach I endeavour to include PWDs in the discussions around how the social and economic structures of their environment influence their experiences.”

Social Work – Emily’s Future

In the future as a social worker involved in rehabilitation, I will need to take a holistic approach to fully understanding the client’s current position and experience of oppression. Only then can I work in collaboration with the client to identify where the inequality they are experiencing stems from and what supports are available to them in order to meet the needs and goals identified.”

“In my future role I will have to work with the individual in order to help them deconstruct the view that disability makes you inferior or incapable. In addressing these disabling barriers by rebuilding their self-confidence, helping them access knowledge and building up their capabilities I can hopefully empower clients.”

Emily concludes: “As a social worker in this arena I will have to ensure I maintain a degree of distance when implementing the strategies agreed upon by the client, providing information and guidance and not completing tasks that the client is capable of doing themselves.”

social work

No-one stated it better.  Well done Emily – you are a worthy recipient of this inaugural award in Social Work.

social work

Happy World Social Work Day  – 19th March 2019

The World Social Work Day theme for 2019 is promoting the importance of human relationships.

Further reading : Everyday Caring 

Also see : Royal Rehab 

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What is normal ?

The accident, that rendered Emily quadriplegic, changed our lives forever but her paralysis hasn’t had an impact on her fun personality, drive and ambition or life goals. When catastrophe occurs we commonly seek to return to our normal. Striving for normality implies that only normalcy delivers a good life which isn’t the case. Being differently-abled  in society is normal which leads me to consider what is normal ?

What is normal ?

 

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Everyday Caring – a can do story…..

Caring is an integral part of life, whether it be for a child, parent, partner or friend. As a carer I maintain a can do attitude which basically translates into everyday caring – a can do story…..

Everyday Caring - a can do story.....

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Everyday Caring Update

Technology has advanced since Emily’s accident in 2012 with social media sites growing so popular that it is difficult to keep up with all the Instagram, Facebook and Twitter ‘feeds’.  While advocating for resources online I now have to be mindful in regard to the volume and validity of information. Here’s my Everyday Caring update…..

Everyday Caring Update

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NDIS What’s reasonable

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Odds of injury?

We are more likely to die from heart disease than at the hands of terrorists. Everyday fate can suddenly change our lives inexplicably however in my experience tragedy revealed enormous inner strength and resilience.

Odds of Injury?

We should live our lives fully not in fear of catastrophe but what are the real odds of injury?

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Further education after SCI

Emily has endeavoured to up-skill herself since her accident in 2012. Emily readily admits that she always wanted to continue her studies. So the process started as she fulfilled a prerequisite course prior to applying for a post-graduate diploma in psychology. Several years on as a graduate of psychology she considered her options – pivotal to her decision was the goal of working in a team with opportunities and variety – leading Emily to choose a Masters of Social Work. 

Further education after SCI

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Raise tables and awareness

Emily and I were at a restaurant recently where the table-top was too low, it didn’t allow Emily’s powered wheelchair to get underneath. Four blocks of wood can solve this problem immediately, lifting the table up and making it accessible in an easy fix ….so let’s raise tables and awareness.

Raise tables and awareness

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Suddenly an Everyday Carer

Highly personal, honest, compelling and readable, Suddenly an Everyday Carer will make you laugh and cry but it’s also a valuable tool and resource full of down-to-earth practical advice and links for anyone living through a trauma.

Suddenly an Everyday Carer

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